Hitting the AYP mark will get harder each year

By QCS Staff

Hitting the AYP mark will get harder each year
By QCS Staff

Out of the 800 public schools in the state, 46 percent made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and 54 percent did not make AYP in 2006, according to an announcement on Tuesday by New Mexico Public Education Secretary Veronica García.

Last year, 372 schools or 47 percent made AYP and 416 schools or 53 percent did not make AYP based on a total of 788 schools.

“It is important to know that this year’s results are a reflection of the increase in the proficiency targets set by NCLB,” she stated in the announcement. “We recognize and accept the fact that No Child Left Behind is raising the bar and raising expectations every year.”

Goals are increased each year so that by the 2013-2014 school year, all schools will have a 100% of their students proficient in reading and math.

Last year a school had to meet a proficiency rate of 36 percent of all students in all sub groups in reading in a K-6 school to meet AYP. This year that target was raised to 40 percent of all students.

This is the second year that New Mexico administered the Standards Based Assessment (SBA) test in grades 3 through 9 and in grade 11 to meet AYP and NCLB requirements.

Garcia said in her announcement, “We are laying the foundation for increased academic achievement by raising the bar for what are students learn and achieve and by holding our teachers to a higher level of accountability.”
Highlights of the report provided by Garcia, include:

  • 18 schools out of 800 or 2.2 percent did not make AYP solely because of attendance or graduation rates
  • Only one of all 800 schools did not make AYP solely because 95 percent of students in one or more sub groups did not take the test, also known as participation rates
  • 94 of all 800 schools or 11.7 percent did not make AYP because of low academic performance of only one sub group of students
  • 414 of all 800 schools – or 52 percent – did not make AYP because of academic performance in mathematics or reading.

Information for this story provided by the N.M. Public Education Department.